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WCM: Session 2-Key Considerations Feeding 2021 Corn Silage and Planning for 2022

Donette Griffith, Administrative Assistant
South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops

Last Modified: January 25, 2022
WCM: Session 2-Key Considerations Feeding 2021 Corn Silage and Planning for 2022

Resources from Winter Crop Meeting 2022: Session 2 (January 21)

Topic: Key Considerations Feeding 2021 Corn Silage and Planning for 2022 with Joe Lawrence

Slides and links available


Fall Alfalfa Management - Dr. Jerry Cherney updated 2021

Janice Degni, Team Leader, Field Crop Specialist
South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops

Last Modified: August 25, 2021

A Comparison of Pre & Post Tassel Fungicides for the Control of NCLB

Janice Degni, Team Leader, Field Crop Specialist
South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops

Last Modified: July 19, 2018

Northern Corn Leaf Blight (NCLB) is one of the most serious diseases of corn. It has become endemic in NYS, affecting all corn growers. Although we cannot predict when first infection will occur, it has occurred regularly for over ten years consecutively. This field scale study sought to measure and compare effects on yields and quality from fungicide treatment at an early and late timing on five cooperating farms in Northern, Central and Eastern New York. Applications were made at two timings: early vegetative and reproductive. Treatments included: 1) an untreated control, two early vegetative fungicide treatments with

2) Priaxor® and 3) Affiance®, and two post tassel treatments of 4) Affiance® and 5) Headline Amp®.  This year was an anomaly because occurrence was absent to arriving fairly late and then only with light infection. NCLB disease incidence was very low, below 1% in the majority of the plots. Although disease pressure from common rust was abundant as well as other abiotic stress factors, there were no statistically significant effects on yield or forage quality components from the fungicide treatments compared to the untreated check plots.

 


First Cutting Updates - Week of May 22nd, 2018

Betsy Hicks, Area Dairy Specialist
South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops

Last Modified: May 30, 2018

An overall assessment of first cutting growth from fields we measured: 

Quite a few farms across the region have started harvest of pure grass stands, as well as mixed stands.  Recommendations are for 50% or less alfalfa stands to make prudent use of this cutting window to harvest for peak dairy quality across the region.  There is still time for pure alfalfa stands to gain yield, given Jerry Cherney's observations.  Look for our final report on Wednesday, May 30th.  We will be sending out a brief survey of how you use the reports, so please feel free to give your assessment of how we are doing in regards to timing of first crop.  You can also reply to Betsy with any comments you may have on the use of the report or how we can improve. 

In the meanwhile, stay safe out in the fields and update the team with any conditions you encounter that would be of interest. 


First Cutting Updates - Week of May 29, 2018

Betsy Hicks, Area Dairy Specialist
South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops

Last Modified: May 30, 2018

An overall assessment of first cutting progress from fields we measured:  Most fields we measure have been harvested or are in the process of being cut.   Early samples we've gotten back have shown that grass cut on recommendations looks really nice.  One all grass sampled showed Adj Prot 22.0%, NDF 53.2 and NDFD 30h at 76.   Early grass varieties are well headed by now, but later maturing grasses are just to head stage.  If you have alfalfa fields standing alongside grass fields, it may be a good idea to harvest the grass for heifer or dry cow haylage, and focus on getting your alfalfa crop for lactating quality.  Most alfalfa fields still standing are showing signs of early bud.  A sample we've gotten back on a mostly alfalfa field cut on recommendations showed Adj Prot 22.6%, NDF of 48 and NDFD at 66, with the NDF and NDFD numbers a bit surprising.  We'd like to see more samples of both grass and alfalfa and mixed if you'd like to share with Janice or Betsy.  


First Cutting Updates - Week of May 15th, 2018

Betsy Hicks, Area Dairy Specialist
South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops

Last Modified: May 15, 2018

An overall assessment of first cutting growth from fields we measured:
Now is the time to cut Pure Grass fields across the region for peak dairy quality forage. Some higher elevations are just at that point, some fields in lower elevations and those in the southern portion of the region are just past that point. Weather forecast looks like rain over the weekend. If you have pure grass stands to harvest for your lactating cows, now is the time to park the corn planter and focus on quality hay crop. For 50/50 mixed stands, recommendations are looking like middle of next week for peak quality. Pure alfalfa stands we still have time - predictions are out to the end of the month at this point for peak quality. Please feel free to share samples you have analyzed with the team to let us know how predictions match up with reality. 


First Cutting Updates - Week of May 8th, 2018

Betsy Hicks, Area Dairy Specialist
South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops

Last Modified: May 8, 2018

An overall assessment of first cutting growth from fields we measured:
Many stands of alfalfa are too short to give adequate predictions for pure grass stand harvest - especially those at higher elevations. That being said, many lower elevation fields have alfalfa measuring 11-12", and predictions for harvest of nearby pure grass fields look like this weekend for peak quality. 50/50 mixed grass/alfalfa stands predictions are saying harvest in ~2 weeks, but time and weather will give us a better prediction next week for mixed stands. Weather looks like rain on Saturday, but a decent stretch of weather to start next week out. Look for our next report on Wednesday, May 16th. In the meanwhile, stay safe out in the fields and update the team with any conditions you encounter that would be of interest.  

What is the potential NDFd of 2017 corn silage?

Last Modified: August 16, 2017

A message from Kevin Putnam, Dairy Specialist with Dupont-Pioneer

Over the last couple of weeks I have been asked multiple times, what will 2017 corn silage quality be like given the rain we have had so far, and is there anything we can do about it? The answer, as always, it depends. The reason it depends is mainly due to three factors, pollination, current inventory, and progress of the current crop. All of which are variable given drought conditions in areas last year, and delayed planting for many this year. In this email I hope to explain what corn silage quality could potentially be, and what management strategies could be utilized to improve it.

First Cutting Updates - Week of May 22nd, 2017

Betsy Hicks, Area Dairy Specialist
South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops

Last Modified: June 7, 2017

First Cutting Updates - Utilizing Alfalfa Heights as a Predictor for Quality

The SCNY team is monitoring alfalfa heights again this spring to help predict quality and %NDF for first cutting hay crop. Alfalfa height has been proven to be a reliable indicator of NDF values in the field for alfalfa, alfalfa/grass mixed and all grass stands. Results will be compiled and emailed on a weekly basis - please feel free to forward on. To be included on the weekly email, or to be removed from the email, please contact Betsy Hicks, bjh246@cornell.edu. 

First Cutting Updates - Week of May 15th, 2017

Betsy Hicks, Area Dairy Specialist
South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops

Last Modified: May 17, 2017

First Cutting Updates - Utilizing Alfalfa Heights as a Predictor for Quality

The SCNY team is monitoring alfalfa heights again this spring to help predict quality and %NDF for first cutting hay crop. Alfalfa height has been proven to be a reliable indicator of NDF values in the field for alfalfa, alfalfa/grass mixed and all grass stands. Results will be compiled and emailed on a weekly basis - please feel free to forward on. To be included on the weekly email, or to be removed from the email, please contact Betsy Hicks, bjh246@cornell.edu.

UPDATES FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 15th, 2017:

Comments from Janice: Mowing has begun and it's right on for clear grass fields since orchard grass is heading and other grasses will be heading in the next week. Alfalfa is approaching or at 2 ft this week. Only occasional early buds found. With the adequate soil moisture and the predicted heat for the week ahead we have the potential to gain significant yield in the next week to alfalfa. The weather windows and percent alfalfa will drive when to target harvest of mixed stands. The time is near and the switch from corn planting to hay harvest may be necessary to capture high quality. Wet fields will be a factor to consider when planning harvest. In soils that have been saturated or even waterlogged over the last 3 weeks the alfalfa is obviously stressed. It's growing very slowing and in some fields actually going backwards. There are spots of significant winter damage, mainly crown heaving. These fields are going to have a disappointing yield and may be candidates for turning into corn after first cutting.

Comments for Southern Counties (Broome, Tioga, Chemung, S Cortland): Most fields saw a good 3" of growth from last week and are above that 20" mark. Hill ground maybe a bit less, but valley ground a bit more. Several fields of triticale and fields of grass have been mowed already, as well as some fields of mixed alfalfa/grass. Fields continue to be drier here than the northern part of the region (I didn't have to use 4wd to access fields this week!), so I would expect more mixed fields to be knocked down in the coming week. Predicted dates to cut for a 50/50 mix in the southern counties is the end of this week to beginning of next week. Forecast looks like rain Thursday/Friday with a decent weekend, although cooler than the heat we're getting today and tomorrow. Pure alfalfa stands still have some time to gain yield while maintaining quality.

Comments for Northern Counties (Tompkins, N Cortland, Onondaga): Fields saw similar growth to the southern counties in our region - a good 3" overall, hovering around that high teens to low 20's in height. The heat and sun in the next two days will hopefully help to dry out conditions. Predictions for peak quality for a 50/50 mix are looking like this weekend. Don't be fooled by the amount of alfalfa in the stand - often we overestimate the amount in the stand and harvest it later than what the grass's peak quality is. The weekend looks like decent weather, so getting on those mixed fields may be a good idea. We still have time to gain yield in higher percentage alfalfa fields without sacrificing quality. Pure alfalfa stands have time to gain for sure - predictions to cut are still out there to around Memorial Day. The 10-day forecast looks like a small percentage of rain every day, so waiting on the weatherman to figure out his forecast won't hurt quality and will gain tonnage on pure stands in the meanwhile.

Thoughts on pure grass fields that are past peak quality: If you are able to segregate your first cutting, you may want to leave your fields that are past peak quality and save them for dry cow or heifer feed and focus on getting your mixed fields in at peak quality. Certainly, field conditions will play a role, but yield can be a factor to take into account as well.

Please let us know conditions you observe while harvesting, and any comments back about the alfalfa height project are appreciated! We also welcome any sample results you would like to share, so forward them on me, bjh246@cornell.edu. You can also post harvest pictures on our team's Facebook page - https://www.facebook.com/SCNYDairyandFieldCropsTeam/ and use the hashtag #harvest2017. 


Harvesting Winter Small Grains in a Wet Spring

Last Modified: May 12, 2017

Tom Kilcer's Advanced Ag Systems: Crop Soils May newsletter addresses timing of harvest for optimizing quality of a winter small grain cover crop.

Tillage and Planting Reminders in a Wet Spring

Last Modified: May 12, 2017

Tom Kilcer outlines some precautions to prevent compaction when tilling and planting under wet conditions with some other spring tips 





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Cornell Seed Growers Field Day

July 2, 2024 : Cornell Seed Growers Field Day
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Spencer, NY

Learn about Tioga County Agriculture! IFree Admission! Enjoy Ice Cream, Animals and Farm Tours, Kid's Activities, Food, Live Music, and Farm Vendors. 

Announcements

Farm Participants Needed for Bale Grazing Grant!

Information on the Project:  
  • Approximately 10 acres total needed to bale graze two different bale densities
  • "Core" farms will graze two winters, "Demo" farms will graze one winter.
  • Payments for both "Core" farms and "Demo" farms
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Interested farms can enroll for this winter or next.

Looking for 2-3 dairy farms to enroll! If interested, please reach out to Betsy Hicks, 607.391.2673 or bjh246@cornell.edu 


Cornell Cow Convos - New Podcast

On-going podcast, New episodes released on the last Thursday of the month.
Guest speakers, CCE Dairy Specialists.

Housed on Soundcloud Channel is CCE Dairy Educators


Topics:
  • Preventative healthcare for cows
  • The trend of beef on dairy
  • What to look forward to in the new year for dairy
  • Socially grouping or pair-housing calves



Dairy Acceleration Program Funds Available

Funds available for the
  • organization of financial records/benchmarking up to $1,000
  • continued business planning (for farms awarded in a previous year) up to $2,500
  • business planning up to $5,000
Guidelines remain the same DAP covers 80% of the cost up to the value of the award and the farm is responsible for 20%.  Visit https://prodairy.cals.cornell.edu/dairy-acceleration/

2018 Drug Residue Prevention Manual

For more than 30 years, the U.S. dairy industry has focused educational efforts on the judicious use of antibiotics through the annual publication of a Best Practices Manual. The 2018 edition of the National Dairy FARM Program: Farmers Assuring Responsible Management? Milk and Dairy Beef Drug Residue Prevention Manual is the primary educational tool for dairy farm managers throughout the country on the judicious and responsible use of antibiotics, including avoidance of drug residues in milk and meat.

The manual is a quick resource to review those antibiotics approved for dairy animals and can also be used as an educational tool and resource for farm managers as they develop on-farm best management practices necessary to avoid milk and meat residues. Visit the Manual and Form Library to download copies of this important tool!



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The team updates our facebook page frequently - follow us to be updated on our events, see some fun videos and get local area updates!

facebook.com/SCNYDairyandFieldCropsTeam


ProDairy Forage Management

Are you prepared to change your routine this spring?

By: Joe Lawrence, Cornell CALS PRO-DAIRY and Ron Kuck, Cornell Cooperative Extension North Country Regional Ag Team


While spring tasks vary by farm, there are many "rites of spring," and they are often completed in a fairly rigid sequence. Depending on the farm, these often include fixing fence, spreading manure, planting new seedings, planting corn and harvesting first cutting, and are often performed in this order.

We are optimistic that the upcoming turn in weather will allow these task to be accomplished in a timely manner, but at this point it is time to ask yourself: Are you willing to change your spring routine?

In addition to adverse weather it is no secret that everyone is facing extremely tight economic times, and dealing with forage inventories of poor digestibility forages from 2017. This combination of factors makes it more critical than ever to be ready to tackle the task that will have the most impact on your business at the proper time.

Recent reference articles on dealing with tough times:
• Key Opportunities to Optimize 2018 Crop Production Efficiency
• Resources for Dealing with Spring Weather Delays
First Cutting
The number one focus should be on timely harvest of first cutting.
• Park the corn planter when a field of first cutting is ready for harvest.
o Monitoring 1st cut harvest timing
• Approach harvest by the acre, not by the field. Be ready to skip over a field that has passed its optimum harvest stage.
o Dynamic Harvest Schedules
• Strategically plan feed storage to best utilize forage inventories for the right group of animals.
o Strategic Forage Storage Planning
o When More is Better
Corn Planting
The window for planting for silage is generally wider than for grain, which is why first cutting can and should take priority over corn planting. However, in the event of extreme delays in planting corn, performance will diminish with late plantings. If corn planting progresses into late May or early June, begin to consider alternative options for those acres. Previous research from Cornell and Penn State suggest a 0.5 to 1 ton/acre per week decline in silage yield for planting after mid to late May.

Multi-Tasking
First and foremost during a time of year that can be very busy and stressful, taking every precaution to keep your team safe is critical.

The idea of fitting all of this work into a condensed time period, and still getting key tasks completed before critical deadlines can seem impossible, but year after year many find unique ways to get it all done. Consider working with neighbors, custom operators or renting equipment to accomplish these key tasks on time.

If you currently utilize custom operators, now is a good time to set up a time to meet with them and make sure you are on the same page to get tasks accomplished in the time-frame needed. Make sure that your expectations and goals are clearly defined. They will also be under stress to fit their work into a condensed period and meet their customers' expectations, so defining expectations and pre-planning how to most efficiently get the work accomplished when the custom operator arrives can go a long way to increase the chances for success.



NYSERDA Agriculture Energy Audit Program

NYSERDA offers energy audits to help eligible farms and on-farm producers identify ways to save energy and money on utility bills. Reports include recommendations for energy efficiency measures.

Eligibility
Eligible farms include but are not limited to dairies, orchards, greenhouses, vegetables, vineyards, grain dryers, and poultry/egg. The farms must also be customers of New York State investor-owned utilities and contribute to the System Benefits Charge (SBC). Please check your farm’s current utility bills to see if your farm pays the SBC.

Energy Audit Options
You can request the level of energy audit that best fits your farm’s needs. NYSERDA will assign a Flexible Technical Assistance Program Consultant to visit your farm and perform an energy audit at no cost to you.

For more information and the NYSERDA Agriculture Energy Audit Program Application click here


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